Novels by Adriana Trigiani, ready and waiting holiday reads!

The Virginia Shop stocks several titles by Adriana Trigiani who is a great friend to the Library of Virginia, hosting our annual Literary Awards celebration with humor, wit and unparalleled style.  We’ve yet to meet anyone who doesn’t love Adriana’s charming books.  Snag one for someone (anyone!) on your list this holiday. Or get one for yourself to enjoy by the fire this winter.

Don’t believe me? Here’s a little insight into the author:

Adriana Trigiani grew up in Big Stone Gap, Virginia, in the 1970s. She has honed her storytelling abilities over a decade of writing and producing some of television’s top-rated shows, including the groundbreaking Cosby Show. Trigiani is also an award-winning playwright and documentary filmmaker. She lives inNew York City with her husband.

Some fascinating, funny outtakes from a Barnes and Noble interview with Trigiani:

“I appeared on the game show Kiddie Kollege on WCYB-TV inBristol,Virginia, when I was in the third grade. I missed every question. It was humiliating.”

“I have held the following jobs: office temp, ticket seller in movie theatre, cook in restaurant, nanny, and phone installer at the Super Bowl inNew Orleans. In the writing world, I have been a playwright, television writer/producer, documentary writer/director, and now novelist.”

“I love rhinestones, faux jewelry. I bought a pair of pearl studded clip on earrings from a blanket on the street when I first moved toNew York for a dollar. They turned out to be a pair designed by Elsa Schiaparelli. Now, they are costume, but they are still Schiaps! Always shop in the street — treasures aplenty.”

“Dear readers, I like you. I am so grateful that you read and enjoy my books. I never forget that — or you — when I am working. I am also indebted to the booksellers who read the advanced reader’s editions and write to me and say, “I’m gonna hand-sell this one.” That always makes me jump for joy. I love the people at my publishing house. Smart. Funny, and I like it when they’re slightly nervous because that means they care. The people I have met since I started writing books have been amazing on every level — and why not? You’re readers. And for someone to take reading seriously means that you are seeking knowledge. Yes, reading is fun, but it is also an indication of a serious-minded person who values imagination and ideas and, dare I say it, art. I never thought in a million years when I was growing up in Big Stone Gap that I would be writing this to you today. Books have always been sacred to me — important, critical, fundamental — and a celebration of language and words. And authors! When I was little, I didn’t play Old Maid, I played authors. They had cards with the famous authors on them. Now, granted, they didn’t look like movie stars, but I loved what they wrote and had to say. I can boil this all down to one thing: I love to tell stories — and I love to hear them. I didn’t think there was a job in the world where I would get to do both, and now thank God, I’ve found it.”